Wednesday, May 15, 2013

Quilters' Favorites - a Linky Party

Welcome to the Quilters' Favorites Linky Party hosted by Geta's Quilting Studio. What's this about? Sharing of tips and tricks, techniques, favorite tools, and all things quilting for the larger quilting world. I love this! Geta gave us a long list of questions we could answer as they relate to our quilting style. I promise to stay short and sweet.
Quilter's Favorites - Visit Geta's for dozens of quilters sharing!
Geta's Quilting Studio: Quilters' Favorites
Favorite Quilting Notions:
Add-A-Quarter Ruler
Did you know this ruler was initially designed to add 1/4" around templates and NOT for paper piecing? It has a raised ridge on the underside which butts up against the folded-back paper on a foundation pattern: no slip, trimming patch with accurate seam so adding the next one is not a guessing game. I do a LOT of paper piecing and have several of these. Here are a few blocks I created with this MUST HAVE ruler:
See the pics in the tutorial here: Paper Piecing Monday
Spinning Waterwheels block from my new book (Paper Piecing Perfect Points)
Pickledish Block
Another Pickledish, but basically a Double Wedding Ring
Read about the progress of this Double Wedding Ring quilt
Paper Pieced Double Wedding Ring
Another can't-do-without-notion is lightweight interfacing (NOT fusible webbing):
Light to medium weight interfacing
Why? I use it to turn under the edges of curved units so that I can then machine applique them to another unit or a larger background. I've been doing this for 20 (gasp!) years ever since I took on a block of the month challenge that involved applique blocks. I DO NOT hand applique and so the thought of needle turn turned my innards to jelly. Here are a few examples of how I have used it in the past few months:
Sew a ring of 1/2 hexies then applique a faced hexagon to the center: Read about here
Sewing around the hexagon center patch; then appliqueing to center of half-hex ring

 This is from the Hugs and Kisses Hop using my Beginner's Mariner's Compass pattern
Can you see the interfaced circle?

Circle appliqued to center; edges neatly turned using interfacing
Colors I Love: 
Brights with good contrast. Why? Not sure, but I've always gravitated towards them. You probably have a favorite palette. Don't sew with other people's colors. You won't have fun. Here is a quote I love to share:
 THE IMPORTANCE OF FABRIC

A book by Sandy Cummings, “Think Outside The Block” gives a great perspective about fabric, and solves the age-old mystery of why we have so many UFOs in our closets.

Always work with fabrics you love. If you do, even when you are experimenting, your commitment lever will be higher. You have a better chance of creating something that you will continue working on and finish. You will also work harder to solve problems that arise. Quilting requires a big investment of time; why compromise on the fabrics you use?

Color is an exciting element of design. It can be subtle and calming or loud and powerful. For an artist it helps express emotion; for the viewer it evokes an emotional response.

Best sewing tip (for machine piecing): 
Get an accurate 1/4" seam. Make sure it is straight. Don't accept anything less. Either purchase a 1/4" foot for your machine or if your machine has the option of moving the needle over (both of mine do) - move that needle! I teach thousands of students each year and this is the greatest hindrance to getting the results they want.

4. Do I have free tutorials on my blog? Yes, but they appear in regular posts and I don't have them in one place. But I will work on that. What are some of my most popular ones?

My EASY version of stack 'n whack
You can see a step by step tutorial here: Spinning Pinwheels
8 identical squares of fabric make 8 kaleidoscope fabrics: lap size quilt
Magical Mitering - no y-seams
Quilt Software?
Loved QuiltPro when I had it. I am a Mac user and don't have any use for EQ. I work in the industry standard for publishing, Adobe Illustrator, and so I design all the art for my books, calendars, patterns and magazine publication using that. I can draw anything and it's print ready.

Tips for Organizing?
I featured my sewing space a few months ago and it was hilarious for me to share those pics. I try to keep it picked up, but I'm an adult with ADHD, so nothing more needs to be said. Take a peek at these:
My trusty Bernina 1230 - 21 years old
 Labeled boxes with class samples, UFOs
Yes, I eat a lot of yogurt. But they keep my UFOs organized

I label every box. Some live in the basement, some in my sewing room closet
 My cutting mat sits on a 28 year old kitchen bar. Perfect height and size
Yes, that's my stash. Mainly organized by color and/or fabric collection
I have sewn for various fabric companies since 2005 and now tend to keep my fabrics together based on those collections. I also have themes (the top left shelf has most of my novelty prints). The far right top two shelves are Westminster (Amy Butler, Kaffe Fassett). I have a shelf for 1930s prints, a whole shelf dedicated to reproduction coverlets. It's the way my brain thinks. Do I misplace things. OF COURSE!

Well, I'm going to stop here. I welcome you to come back and visit. Almost every post features some tip or trick or piecing technique. As Special Projects Editor of a magazine for 14 years and a traveling teacher with thousands of students each year, I am constantly learning and sharing in the world of quilting. And my blog reflects that. Thanks for stopping by!


6 comments:

  1. My storage of choice is corn dog boxes. They're perfect for most small projects and have a wonderful attached top so that they're easy to keep track of. (And they're great for stacking!)

    The one thing I do NOT do, however, is label them. When I am looking for a project it's a bit of a treasure hunt at times!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Estupendo artículo. Gracias por ofrecerlo.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thank you for sharing your favorites, Debby. That lightweight interfacing is so useful, we should use it more often.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Great tips... Thanks for sharing and for the tutorials!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Thanks Debby, As always an interesting post.

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for stopping by Debby Kratovil Quilts! If you had a question and don't get an answer from me, please feel free to email me at: kratovil@his.com