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Showing posts from May, 2022

Coffee Filter Mariner's Compass, Day 1

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Some small, some REALLY large! A coffee filter is nothing more than a paper circle. I've been intrigued with the sewing potential for almost 30 years. Here's the first one that I did some string piecing on. I cut the circle in half and used up some scraps.  And here it is from the back. I still take these with me to trunk show presentations! The first compass I drafted for a coffee filter appeared both in the pages of Quilt Magazine and also in my first book (Bold, Black and Beautiful, AQS 2004). Autumn Mariner's Compass. Block Size: 14" x 14". Quilt Size: 23" x 23" Drafting a compass has been around for hundreds of years. Take a look at the page I wrote for the compass quilt in my book. I made a larger one in green and it was the basis for a dozen or so workshops. We did not piece on coffee filters, but I took the concept and drafted the foundations on newsprint for my students. This appeared in my 3rd book (Paper Piecing Perfect Points). Block Size: 16

Baby Blocks Quilt Finished

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She's finished. Karen R. of my local quilt guild (Reston QU in Virginia) beautifully quilted this. I put the binding on. It is part of our charity quilt endeavors (probably will become a wheelchair lap quilt.) 7 Block Baby Blocks quilt: 38" x 40" I made these Baby Blocks the old fashioned way - with y-seams! You've seen these little blocks before. These are 4-1/2" rotary cut 60 degree diamonds. Single Baby Blocks Here is the y-seam from the back. You can see how the 3 seams come together in the center. Then the 1/4" where there is NO seam is spun. Lies flat that way. Baby blocks from wrong side. I squeezed the life out of that swirly fabric. I had to seam two diamonds - gasp! But, it works! This block measures 8" finished from flat side to flat side. I used 4-1/2" 60 degree triangles to set them together. Look closely and you'll see the seams in the multi-colored diamonds I used a mottled batik in a light print for those setting triangles. When

Vintage Midnight Sun in Today's Fabrics

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Antique Midnight Sun Quilt - 70" x 85" I'm often asked where I get my inspiration from. I have to say: from traditional quilts! Why should I reinvent the wheel when there are so many glorious quilts that are timeless? All I do is just change out their clothes, giving them new colors. This quilt appeared in a magazine years ago and is called "Midnight Sun." It was probably pieced by hand and used carefully cut templates. How did I update it? So glad you asked! Seeing Red - 38" x 38", Block Size: 15" Well, here you have it. Seeing Red is my version of the Antique Midnight Sun. Four blocks and I was done (could that be because I also ran out of fabric?) Don't you love those sharp points? And don't you just love templates and hand piecing - NOT!!! All foundation pieced. This appeared in my 2013 book, Paper Piecing Perfect Points. Yes, you can have blocks with VERY SHARP POINTS!  I loved the block so much that I am almost finished with another

More 3/4" Hexagons

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To give you an idea of the size of various hexagons, I like to show my students my stack of GFG blocks with the smallest (that I make) being 3/4" hexagons. That's the blue one on the top with the yellow center. The next size is the pink one made using 1" hexagons. Then 1-1/2" (missing 1-1/4"), 1-3/4" and the bottom turquoise floral uses 2" hexagons. Stack of GFG blocks to show how size matters! I was working with some lovely Northcott sparkly fabrics in blues and browns and I decided to add another round. First, a block I made about 15 years ago using 1" hexagons. I appliquéd it to a background square in 2013. Still waits for a finish! Triple round GFG using 1" hexagons More on that block at a later date. Here is a closeup of the blocks I made using 3/4" hexagons. There are 6 medium brown hexagons surrounding the center dark brown hexagon and then 12 turquoise hexagons in that 3rd round. GFG using 3/4" hexagons And one with the colo

FREE May Calendar of Blocks

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I work in some pretty powerful computer programs and sometimes I surprise myself! I was able to change the 2016 Calendar of 365 blocks to a 2022 calendar! It is just eye candy (no patterns), but I'm going to work on that once I identify where each block appeared in the 18 calendars I designed! I can only find them by name (and there are THOUSANDS). May 2022 Block a Day Calendar If you would like a copy for printing and hanging in your office or kitchen or sewing room, I would be delighted for you to have one. It must be PRINTED ON LEGAL SIZE PAPER. It's that long. I'm almost finished with the January through April months and I'll offer those here (I know - the months are gone, but there are some cute blocks.) Since I only recently realized I could repurpose my blocks, I'm doing some serious catchup. But go ahead and click the link for the pdf file of the  May 2022 Block a Day Calendar . And, once you look at them, let me know your favorite! kratovil@his.com Please D

Quilt Calendar Blocks

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Hard to believe, but I have authored 18 quilting calendars since 2006! 15 of those were desktop, block a day calendars with full instructions for making dozens of quilts in each. Do you remember these?  I began creating these in 2006 and my publisher retired the projects after 2020. Big sigh, but, to tell you the truth, they were a LOT of work! Besides having to create 320 unique quilt blocks for each one, I had to  have dozens of quilt patterns (and I mean DOZENS!) for each year. That meant not only designing them but calculating all the yardage, etc. You can bet I negotiated a much higher compensation after the first 2 years. Who works for 10 cents an hour (except in China) these days? Here's one from my 2016 calendar (July). I called it Gold Star Eagles. I used a vintage appliqué eagle combined with that awesome Rising Sun and variation blocks. They are 12" x 12" with the whole quilt finishing to 50" x 50". Gold Star Eagles from my 2016 Block a Day Calendar

Flowers, Hexagons and Mother's Day

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I cut and stitch and sew whatever my little brain decides. I look at a stack of fabric and it whispers to me (honest, but don't call the men in white coats!) This little quilt began on a cross country trip for teaching. I used 3/4" hexagons to create little Grandmother's Flower Garden blocks (GFG). Then I appliquéd them to hexagon backgrounds. First the little GFG blocks. This one was stitched at 35,000 feet flying home from Des Moines. GFG using 3/4" hexagons (on an airplane tray at 35,000 feet!) Another block from the back with the papers still on Papers are easy to remove using those punched holes. And one after removing the papers I cut larger hexagon backgrounds and then appliquéd the blocks on. And I will not have any y-seams! Wrong side of an appliquéd GFG unit I did this to six blocks and added some setting triangles . . . Six hexagon blocks with green setting triangles pinned Press the triangles, and then I'll stitch them into a circle The 7th center hexa